Fed Keto

Dietitian-curated meals delivered to you fresh; ready to eat when you are.
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All Your Nutrition, Daily.

We believe it should be simple to give your body the nutrients it needs every day. We believe in the power of food to boost energy levels, provide clarity of body and mind, and improve overall health and longevity. We believe in providing balanced, nutrient dense meals to help you live, look and feel your best.
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Full Nutrition™
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Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) is a measure outlined by Health Canada that quantifies the average daily dietary intake sufficient to meet the nutrient requirement of nearly all (97%-98%) healthy people in a specific age group. Full Nutrition™ means meeting the RDA for all nutrients, every single day.

Too often people struggle to combine the right foods and ingredients necessary to meet the RDAs for all nutrients. This is not surprising as it requires tracking over 30 different nutrients. Fed makes it a priority to source, plan and prepare the ingredients and foods that will meet 100% of your RDAs each day. Only one company offers Full Nutrition™ meals — Fed.

Expert Designed

Our dietitian designed meals prioritize vitamins, minerals, and whole ingredients, bringing a new level of nutrient-focus to keto eating.

Delivered to your Door

Save time on grocery shopping and do more of the things you love with our convenient home or office delivery.

Ready to Eat in Minutes

Our meals are professionally planned and prepared. Your meals are in your fridge, ready to eat when you are.

Nutrients and Benefits

Fed considers over 30 nutrients in every meal. Here’s a breakdown of these nutrients and their benefits.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is essential for eye health and important for the immune system. It can be found in both plant and animal foods. Plant foods provide a precursor of vitamin A called carotenoids which our bodies must convert into Vitamin A. On the other hand, animal foods provide preformed vitamin A. Both plant and animal sources of Vitamin A undergo activation in the body.  It’s best to get Vitamin A from food to avoid getting too much of it through supplements.

B Vitamins

B Vitamins (includes: Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12) are water soluble vitamins with a range of uses in the body. They are important in normal neurological development and functioning, DNA synthesis, protein synthesis, and the formation of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets  . The bioavailability of many B vitamins is higher in animal foods, but it’s still possible to get all your B vitamins with a plant-based diet. Excess quantities of these vitamins aren’t stored (they are excreted in urine) so it’s important to consume adequate amounts on a daily basis.

Vitamin C and E

These vitamins are important antioxidants that protect cells from damage, and assist in tissue growth and repair. They’re also important factors in fighting disease. These two nutrients are best obtained through food and need to be consumed daily as neither are made in our bodies.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D enhances calcium absorption, contributing to the development and maintenance of strong, dense bones. It has a role in supporting our immune system and can be made in our bodies after exposure to UV light. However, for those living in colder climates where sun exposure may be minimal due to heavy clothing or limited sun exposure for much of the year, it is important to get vitamin D from food or supplements. It can be challenging to get adequate vitamin D from the regular foods we consume, making Full Nutrition meals a valuable option.

Vitamin K

Vitamin K is an important part of blood clotting. There is also some evidence to show that it can also contribute to maintenance of bone density and calcium balance . Vitamin K can be found in both plant and animal foods, but is most abundant in dark leafy vegetables. Regularly eating varied diet, rich in dark green vegetables, will provide adequate amounts of vitamin K.

Iron

Iron is essential for the development of healthy, functioning blood cells. Blood cells require iron to transport oxygen throughout the body. Without adequate iron your energy levels can suffer. Iron can be found in both plant and animal foods, however the type of iron in each food differs. Plants and enriched foods contain what is called “non-heme” iron. Animal based products contain “heme” iron. Heme iron is more efficiently absorbed and used by our bodies. However, you can improve your bodies’ absorption and use of non-heme iron by a) consuming heme iron foods at the same time as non-heme foods or b) consuming vitamin C at the same time you consume non-heme iron. Fed makes a point of including iron rich plant foods, such as green vegetables, nuts and fortified grains, with a source of vitamin C in all meals.

Calcium

Calcium has a significant role in bone and teeth health. It’s important for muscle contraction, nerve function, and blood clotting. Bones are the storage unit for calcium. If we don’t get enough calcium in our diet, the calcium we need for other functions, like muscle contraction, comes from our bones. Low calcium intake over the long term can lead to weak and brittle bones, increasing the risk of bone breaks and fractures. In order to prevent this, we fill our meals with calcium rich foods like chia seeds, leafy greens, cheese and yogurt.

Zinc, Selenium, and Copper

These trace minerals are antioxidants and have a multitude of different roles in the body. They all participate in maintaining a healthy, functioning immune system. Selenium may also play a role in keeping the thyroid healthy. Copper helps the body absorb iron and form blood cells. Zinc participates in many different enzyme reactions including ones involved in wound healing and protein synthesis. Each mineral can be found in a variety of foods and we only need a little per day.

Magnesium and Phosphorus

Magnesium and phosphorus are essential minerals that allow the body to process food into energy. Magnesium alone is involved in more than 300 different enzyme interactions in the body. Phosphorous can be found in every cell in your body. Taken together, they are also important for bone health. We can get these minerals from a variety of foods, and our digestive system and kidneys regulate the amount of these minerals in our body.

Sodium and Chloride

These minerals are necessary for proper cell functioning. They’re usually ingested together in the form of NaCl (sodium chloride or table salt) and are found abundantly in our foods. It is much more likely to get too much of these minerals than too little. Too much sodium can elevate your blood pressure which, over time, can damage your blood vessels and lead to heart disease and/or kidney disease. At Fed, we limit our sodium content. The total sodium of all three meals will not have more than 2300mg per day, although most days are well below that target.

Potassium

Potassium is another mineral, also an electrolyte, ubiquitous in our bodies and in our foods. It is important for blood pressure control and muscle contraction, including playing a key role in proper heart function . Potassium levels in our bodies are regulated by the kidneys. This mineral plays an important role in heart function. Eating a varied diet of fruits, vegetables, meats, dairy and whole grains — as provided by Fed — can provide adequate amounts of potassium daily. Therefore, it is NOT recommended to take a potassium supplement.

Carbohydrates and Fibre

Our body’s main source of energy is carbohydrates. They’re found most abundantly in foods such as grains (wheat, rice, barley), starchy vegetables (potatoes, yams, peas), legumes and fruit. These foods also contain fibre, which is indigestible by our bodies but very useful in slowing digestion, prolonging satiety and promoting regularity. There are two main types of fibre: insoluble and soluble fibre. Insoluble fibre, which helps move things along the digestive tract, is found in whole grains and vegetables. Soluble fibre is found in legumes, oats and barley, and can play a part in regulating blood cholesterol and/or blood sugar.

Fats

Fat (including saturated and healthy fats) is needed for proper cell function, hormone regulation, energy balance and the transportation of certain vitamins. Fats are the most energy dense food available. Different types of fat — saturated and unsaturated — are processed differently by your body. While both types of fat are part of a healthy diet, too much saturated fat over a long period of time can negatively impact your heart health. Fed aims to keep saturated fats under 22g per day, which is around 10% of your total caloric intake. The remainder of fat in our meals comes from unsaturated fats like omega-3s!

What We Limit

We keep an eye on certain ingredients, so that you don't have to.

Saturated Fat

Fat (including saturated and healthy fats) is needed for proper cell function, hormone regulation, energy balance and the transportation of certain vitamins. Fats are the most energy dense food available. Different types of fat — saturated and unsaturated — are processed differently by your body. While both types of fat are part of a healthy diet, too much saturated fat over a long period of time can negatively impact your heart health. Fed aims to keep saturated fats under 22g per day, which is around 10% of your total caloric intake. The remainder of fat in our meals comes from unsaturated fats like omega-3s!

Trans Fat

Trans fats are a form of fat that can increase your risk of heart disease. Many animal products (such as meat and cheese) will contain very small amounts of trans fat since they are naturally made in the animal. These are the only trans fats you will see in our meals. Fed does not add any trans fats or use any products containing partially hydrogenated oils (which give rise to trans fat).

Sodium

These minerals are necessary for proper cell functioning. They’re usually ingested together in the form of NaCl (sodium chloride or table salt) and are found abundantly in our foods. It is much more likely to get too much of these minerals than too little. Too much sodium can elevate your blood pressure which, over time, can damage your blood vessels and lead to heart disease and/or kidney disease. At Fed, we limit our sodium content. The total sodium of all three meals will not have more than 2300mg per day, although most days are well below that target.

Cholesterol

Cholesterol, while often vilified, is essential for building cells and producing important body hormones. Although high blood cholesterol is bad for your heart, most recent evidence has shown that in healthy individuals, dietary cholesterol plays a minimal impact in blood cholesterol levels and will not likely impact your heart health . Cholesterol can only be found in animal products like meat, seafood, eggs and dairy product. These foods also have important nutrients like protein and calcium. It’s important you get 100% of your required nutrients every day, so we keep cholesterol as low as possible while also ensuring you meet your recommended daily intake.

Added Sugar

Many healthy foods contain naturally occurring sugars, such as fruit, grains, and dairy products. However, sugar can also be added to foods for flavour. Added sugars come in the form of granulated sugar, brown sugar, syrups, honey, agave, corn sweeteners and more. Too much added sugar can contribute to obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and other chronic illnesses . Any sugar added to Fed meals is limited to less than 5% of total daily calories [this is much lower than the current World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation of less than 10% of total daily calories].

Sample Full Nutrition™ Menu

We make a new menu every week, to give you the ultimate variety in your diet, and to make sure you never get bored. Below is an example of what a week on Full Nutrition looks like.
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Tofu Breakfast Quesadilla

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Strawberry Bread Pudding

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Spinach, Tomato & Feta

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Chocolate Chip Pancakes

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Black Bean Breakfast Burrito

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Breakfast Potatoes

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Kale & Quinoa Bowl with Lentil Fritters

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Creamy Mushroom Pasta with Grilled Chicken

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Tuna Sun-Dried Tomato Sandwich

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Pesto Pork Chops with Quinoa

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Rice Noodle Bowl

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Beef Bolognese Pasta

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Bean Quesadilla

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Spiced Carrot & Lentil Salad

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Mango Bowl

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Steak Mushroom Pasta

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Pork Chops with Greek Style Quinoa Salad

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Cauliflower Chickpea Sweet Potato Curry

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Breakfast Potatoes

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Black Bean Breakfast Burrito

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Chocolate Chip Pancakes

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Spinach, Tomato & Feta

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Strawberry Bread Pudding

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Tofu Breakfast Quesadilla

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Tofu Breakfast Quesadilla

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Strawberry Bread Pudding

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Spinach, Tomato & Feta

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Chocolate Chip Pancakes

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Black Bean Breakfast Burrito

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Breakfast Potatoes

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Cauliflower Chickpea Sweet Potato Curry

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Pork Chops with Greek Style Quinoa Salad

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Steak Mushroom Pasta

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Mango Bowl

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Spiced Carrot & Lentil Salad

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Bean Quesadilla

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Beef Bolognese Pasta

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Rice Noodle Bowl

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Pesto Pork Chops with Quinoa

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Tuna Sun-Dried Tomato Sandwich

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Creamy Mushroom Pasta with Grilled Chicken

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Kale & Quinoa Bowl with Lentil Fritters

MON
Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Tofu Breakfast Quesadilla

TUE
Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Strawberry Bread Pudding

WED
Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Spinach, Tomato & Feta

THU
Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Chocolate Chip Pancakes

FRI
Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Black Bean Breakfast Burrito

SAT
Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Breakfast Potatoes

THU
Dinner
Full Nutrition

Cauliflower Chickpea Sweet Potato Curry

TUE
Lunch
Full Nutrition

Pork Chops with Greek Style Quinoa Salad

WED
Lunch
Full Nutrition

Steak Mushroom Pasta

THU
Lunch
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Mango Bowl

FRI
Lunch
Full Nutrition

Spiced Carrot & Lentil Salad

SAT
Lunch
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Bean Quesadilla

MON
Dinner
Full Nutrition

Beef Bolognese Pasta

TUE
Dinner
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Rice Noodle Bowl

WED
Dinner
Full Nutrition

Pesto Pork Chops with Quinoa

MON
Lunch
Full Nutrition

Tuna Sun-Dried Tomato Sandwich

FRI
Dinner
Full Nutrition

Creamy Mushroom Pasta with Grilled Chicken

SAT
Dinner
Full Nutrition

Kale & Quinoa Bowl with Lentil Fritters

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Tofu Breakfast Quesadilla

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Strawberry Bread Pudding

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Spinach, Tomato & Feta

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Chocolate Chip Pancakes

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Black Bean Breakfast Burrito

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Breakfast Potatoes

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Cauliflower Chickpea Sweet Potato Curry

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Pork Chops with Greek Style Quinoa Salad

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Steak Mushroom Pasta

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Mango Bowl

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Spiced Carrot & Lentil Salad

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Bean Quesadilla

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Beef Bolognese Pasta

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Rice Noodle Bowl

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Pesto Pork Chops with Quinoa

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Tuna Sun-Dried Tomato Sandwich

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Creamy Mushroom Pasta with Grilled Chicken

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Kale & Quinoa Bowl with Lentil Fritters

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Tofu Breakfast Quesadilla

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Strawberry Bread Pudding

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Spinach, Tomato & Feta

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Chocolate Chip Pancakes

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Black Bean Breakfast Burrito

Breakfast
Full Nutrition

Scrambled Eggs with Breakfast Potatoes

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Cauliflower Chickpea Sweet Potato Curry

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Pork Chops with Greek Style Quinoa Salad

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Steak Mushroom Pasta

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Mango Bowl

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Spiced Carrot & Lentil Salad

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Bean Quesadilla

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Beef Bolognese Pasta

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Chicken & Rice Noodle Bowl

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Pesto Pork Chops with Quinoa

Lunch
Full Nutrition

Tuna Sun-Dried Tomato Sandwich

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Creamy Mushroom Pasta with Grilled Chicken

Dinner
Full Nutrition

Kale & Quinoa Bowl with Lentil Fritters

Disclaimer

Fed provides you with 100% or more of Health Canada’s set Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for each nutrient. Some nutrients don’t have RDAs including, but not limited to, Manganese, Potassium, Pantothenic Acid, and Vitamin K. While nutrient targets for these nutrients are also dictated by Health Canada, they are based on what is called an Adequate Intake (AI), which Fed doesn’t attempt to meet. Data about the content of Biotin, Choline, Chromium, Fluoride, Iodine and Molybdenum in food is not available and therefore not tracked by Fed.

The Impact of Nutrition on Health

We’ve all heard about the food pyramid and seen the %Daily Value labels on food and beverage products. However, the majority of people don’t have the time and energy to consume a diet that fully addresses their nutrition needs. As a result, malnutrition is prevalent, even in the industrialized world. We are overfed and undernourished. In Canada, 5 in 10 women and 7 in 10 men have energy intakes that exceed their energy needs, which has led to an increased prevalence of those who are overweight and obese. Yet, 76% of the Canadian population is estimated to have a deficiency in Vitamin D.
Through calorie control and nutrient tracking, Fed meals help reduce the risk of diet-related, non-communicable diseases — one of the leading causes of death in Canada.
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